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American Girls Collection: Addy Learns a Lesson

by Connie Porter
After escaping from a plantation in North Carolina, Addy and her mother arrive in Philadelphia, where Addy attends school for the first time! 63 pages, Ages 7-11

Item Number: 223
Category:Shorter Fiction in Contracted Braille (in EBAE)

Price: $9.75
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Reviews for American Girls Collection: Addy Learns a Lesson
RatingComments
5For the first time in her life, Addy Walker attends school. Her mother (unable to read or write herself)gave her daughter a special dress to wear so she can successfully represent the family's rapidly rising expectations in Philadelphia. In addition to formal educational instruction, Addy learns that not every person is friendly and bigotry is not confined to white southerners whom she had escaped from in the first book (Meet Addy). For whatever reason, some other African Americans look down upon people trying to escape slavery and obtain their freedom. A classmate named Harriet openly pretends she is better than other classmates because her family has enjoyed freedom longer. The teacher's quick intervention reminds students in 19th century America that all African Americans are subordinated and freedom depends on each student working together inside their community. Addy practices her lessons by teaching her mother how to read using dough in their boarding house room. Possessing maturity beyond her physical years, Addy understands her mom also needs to read. In addition to increasing her ability to obtain employment, this will enable the mother/daughter relationship to remain as the two live and work in Philadelphia. Examining American history through the eyes of a young girl, Porter reassures her readers that things are not always supposed to be easily understood upon first encounter. The most endearing lessons have several moral and ethical angles.
2011-07-22

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